Kaiseki Meal: Simple is Best

Anyone who knows me knows I’m chronically indecisive, particularly when it comes to food. I’m the terrible person who, in the middle of making their order at a restaurant, will change their mind and point to something else at the last second after the waitress has already scrawled down my original order. Or worse, I used to tell waiters, “Surprise me,” because I simply couldn’t make the decision myself. (I’ve been told that this is a terrible thing to say …

Sustainability in Parisian Households Interviews

  Rather than a more traditional long-form interview, I chose to conduct brief interviews with a variety of French inhabitants. Specifically, I spoke with twelve people ranging from full-time Parisian inhabitants to American students experiencing cultural immersion by living in French homestays. I thought it would be interesting to hear from a variety of perspectives in order to encapsulate the melting pot culture that comprises most major cities, Paris included. Below you can find excerpts from their thoughts on sustainability …

An Ode to Shiru Cafe

  Amherst and Doshisha are eerily similar in a lot of ways. The founder of Doshisha, Joe Nishijima, built it after being inspired by Amherst, after all, so it makes sense. But some of the similarities hit a little too close to home. For example, there is an alumni building on campus called “Amherst House” that looks identical to Garman House. The style of all of the structures are similar to that of Amherst, and the school color is a …

Adaptation out of Necessity: Grocery Shopping

Adaptation. A fantastic characteristic to have, as well as an esoteric, indie Nicolas Cage movie. The former being a necessary skill to have when abroad, and the latter being a nice thing to have while abroad. This skill becomes especially important while transitioning between cultures, and particularly between America and Japan. I don’t think that many people expect for grocery shopping to be a difficult thing when going abroad. Language, cultural customs, financial difficulties — sure! These are the things …

Konbini- A Glimpse into Food Culture through Convenience Stores

こびに (Konbini): the convenience store. The holy trinity of Japan: 7-11, Lawson’s, and Family Mart. They’re inescapable, rounding every street corner (sometimes two right across the street from one another) of every city in Japan. Introduced in 1969, they have quickly become a staple of the Japanese diet, serving students, businessmen, and families — all different walks of Japanese life. They’re everywhere. Imagine the popularity and numbers of Starbucks, McDonalds, and CVS combined, and that is the amount of konbini …